To all who mourn in Israel, He will give a crown of beauty for ashes, a joyous blessing instead of mourning, festive praise instead of despair. In their righteousness, they will be like great oaks that the LORD has planted for his own glory. Isaiah 61:3

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

The MET Moire Mourning Dress is Complete!



When I first started "collecting" mourning dress images on my Pinterest board Mourning Fashion, I came across this dress that is housed in The MET.  It is made of black moire.  Mourning.  Moire.  Moire.  Mourning.  Can we say match made in heaven?  Loving all things mourning and loving moire, how could I resist recreating this dress?  Well, it is finally complete.  It took me a while to locate and purchase the fabric, which I ended up acquiring from Hobby Lobby, but acquire it I did!  Huzzah!  I am so happy this dress is complete.  I don't think I have ever had such an issue completing a bodice as I did with this one.  It was a colossal pain in the butt.  I almost didn't finish it, so frustrated with it did I become on several occasions.  But, I pushed through and happiness is the final outcome!

Also, an aspect of this project was a first for me.  The use of fringe.  I would like to take this opportunity to apologize to those who love/adore/appreciate fringe.  You see, they remind me of Halloween store flapper costumes and B-Western cowboy shirts.  There is nothing wrong with the previous items, but to see fringe on a lovely Victorian dress?  It has taken me quite a while to come to terms with this. I guess the fact that the Victorian dresses came before the 1920s flapper dresses and B-Western shirts helps quite a bit.  Wanting to stick with the spirit and originality of The MET dress, I chose to use fringe on mine as well.

The only thing I have to do to complete the entire project is to make a hand sewn eyelet lace collar and lengths of hand sewn eyelet lace for the under sleeves.  At this point I am totally procrastinating as I don't want to design it right now...


The Dress






Inspiration for my dress.  Source:  The MET




The fringe.  I am still sort of cringing at the fringe...













I had to make a separate peplum for the back of the bodice.  When the peplum was attached, the bodice refused to fit correctly.  It pulled and did all sorts of nasty things.  However, upon some research, I discovered that there were other bodices that had separate peplums!  Huzzah for that!







Pattern:  
Bodice: Simplicity 4510
Sleeves: Simplicity 2887
Skirt:  me made


More Underwear

Because I needed more new underwear for this project, I also made a new petticoat trimmed with antique eyelet lace and cage crinoline.




Petticoat:
Pattern:  Self drafted
Fabric:  Cotton




Beautiful antique eyelet lace trims the petticoat.




Cage Crinoline:
Fabrics:  cotton and gros grain ribbon


So now I get to design and make the eyelet lace bits.  I do have several inspiration images that will guide me, so that part is over...

I hope you all have a marvelous rest of your week!

Blessings!

g

18 comments:

  1. Hi! it looks wonderfull, all your labor with he underpinnings, the eyelet embroidery on the chemise is awesome, also that you have eyelet petticoat, and perhaps in the near future eyelet collar and cuffs too. In regard of fringes, I'm a "hater" too, find it heavy and very home drapery-y, especially the heavy and dust magneting chenilles...phooey! Unfortunately victorians were fond of all these, so have to get used to them. About your fabric, what material is it? And yes, good moire is hard to find, as every sort of good quality fabric nowadays :( I search a lot on ebay or other fabric online shops, but sometimes the prices are horror! In the future, which victorian period mourning dress will be next? Or now you just rest and don't plan :) Have a nice day!

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    1. Hi Melinda! So happy I'm not the only fringe "hater". I just can't seem to make myself like it! And I shudder at the chenilles! The fabric is a cotton/poly blend moire. I couldn't find any silk moire so went with what was available. And as you said the horror of any possible silk moire just made the decision all the more easier! hahahahahaha!! I am wanting to work on a stripe silk satin (found at a thrift store!) 1840s dress for late fall! I can't wait to start on it!
      Blessings!
      g

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  2. Replies
    1. Thank you so much Cousin!
      Blessings!
      g

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  3. All the moire!!! It is all lovely and flawless my friend! Woot!!!

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    1. Yes! All the moire!! Thank you so much my friend!
      Blessings!
      g

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  4. The original might have had silk fringe, and I don't think it's even made anymore -- but I find that the original doesn't have the fringe pop out so much. That could be what's making you still uncertain about it.

    It looks gorgeous, btw, so I wouldn't worry about it. Another job excellently done!

    Tegan

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    1. Hello Tegan! Thank you so much for the insight into the original fringe. I thought for a very brief moment about making my own fringe, then quickly cast aside the crazy notion! Thank you also for your lovely compliments!
      Blessings!
      g

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  5. So very beautiful. Black moire is on my wish list now.
    And omg, you're making your own eyelet? And here I thought I had a lot of spare time!
    Val

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    1. I might not be making the eyelet now. I am sort of "over" this dress and am wanting to move on. Time will tell thought!
      Blessings!
      g

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  6. WOW oh WOW! The dress with fringe and all is fantastic, Gina! The moire really makes it shine, who knew mourning fashion could be so glamorous?! Oh, and the undergarments are just as neat...I am in awe of your many talents :o

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    1. Thank you sweet Anneliese! You know me and mourning...love it! I can't wait to do the photo shoot now!
      Blessings!
      g

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  7. P.S. When do we get to see your 19th century mourning fashions timeline?!? You must be getting close to having a black dress for every decade...

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    1. You are so fabulous Anneliese! I wish I had all the dresses. So far I have 1840s, 1850s, 1860s, Second Bustle, and a mourning Edwardian court presentation gown. So, not nearly enough for this Mourning Lady!

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  8. It is GORGEOUS, you crazy lady! I can only dream of recreating a piece to such perfection. And honestly, the fringe is awesome. Lace or ribbon or any other trim just would not have looked right, with that stunning fabric. I think it is perfect. :) And, your petticoat is to die for. I have a massive weakness for white, tucks, and eyelet.....and antique eyelet at that, oh my. :) Have fun wearing such a pretty dress!!!

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    1. Thank you for your encouraging compliments Sarah! I needed to hear them especially concerning the fringe. I purchased another trim that was a very thin cording with velvet running through it and it looked really cheap, so the fringe it was! I am with you in the weakness for white, tucks and eyelet! It is just so fun!
      Blessings!
      g

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  9. This came out beautifully! And while you still might cringe, I think your fringe is lovely and quite tasteful :)

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    1. Thank you for much L.R.! I am coming to appreciate it on the dress as it is on the original. Tasteful is the key in this instance, so thank you for that!
      Blessings!
      g

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