To all who mourn in Israel, He will give a crown of beauty for ashes, a joyous blessing instead of mourning, festive praise instead of despair. In their righteousness, they will be like great oaks that the LORD has planted for his own glory. Isaiah 61:3

Thursday, October 22, 2015

1840s Mourning Bonnet Complete!

Huzzah!!  With the bonnet complete for my 1840s Mourning ensemble, I now only have to tackle the dress before next Saturday!  I think I can to it!

I really admire the gorgeous bonnet from the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, and so decided that it was what I would use for my ensemble.  It is simple and elegant and conveys mourning perfectly.

I used all fabrics from my stash!  Huzzah for that!  I think this ensemble is going to all come from my stash!  Anyhoo, it is made of black cotton, black silk crape, silk tulle and silk dupioni.  I was happy to find some vintage flat black satin ribbon today for the ties!




The original is made of silk and silk crape.  The ties are also made of crape, but I didn't want to use that for my ties as it seemed like they would have been a bit flimsy.


The website for the original doesn't have a view of the inside of the bonnet so I don't know what that looks like.  I decided I wanted to make the bonnet appropriate for half or second mourning as I have a really fabulous antique hair brooch I will be wearing with this ensemble.  Plus I want to use my cashmere shawl with the dress, so white on the inside it is!  I had seen on a few examples that there is a ruffle around the brim and thought it rather sweet and soft.




The curtain on the original is trimmed in crape, a fun accent! 



I was sort of stressing about the non-smoothness of the cotton on the top, sort of like wavey wrinkles.  Then I noticed that the original has them so I feel much better!  If the Victorians could have non smooth bonnets, so can I!!

I hope you have all had a really marvelous week so far!  I am going to sit back and relax and give my grouchy fingers a break!

Blessings!

g

18 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Thank you so much Samantha!
      Blessings!
      g

      Delete
  2. Oh I love it! It looks exactly like the original! You always do such an amazing job with hats !!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you MaiLoan! I was hoping to make it look like the original!
      Blessings!
      g

      Delete
  3. Hi! The bonnet tutorial and the finished work are great! Now we can hardly wait a week to see the full ensemble! The original name of that bonnet "curtain" is bavolet. Fun how every piece of clothing was named specifically (unlike today, when we don't even have any speciality in dressing) :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha!! I had the hardest time remembering what the original name was...I kept coming up with balayeuse, which is a dust ruffle for a skirt and Google was no help!! I finally just decided to use curtain!! Grrrrrr.... Bavolet. I'll have to wrote THAT down so I don't have such a hard time next time!!
      I agree with the names!! Very interesting and useful!
      Blessings!
      g

      Delete
  4. Great bonnet. I've been making quite a few recently and enjoy it very much but it is hard on the fingers. Thank goodness for curved needles though. I love the use of crepe on yours - it is subtle but very effective. Congratulations!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! And yes, the hats and bonnets are seriously hard on the fingers!
      Blessings!
      g

      Delete
  5. Oooooohhh, thank you for the bonnet!!! :D
    Wait, huh? You didn't make it for me? Oh man! ;)
    This bonnet is just too, too gorgeous. You did an amazing job (surprise, surprise!) of replicating the original bonnet; it seriously looks like the same one! No need for bonnet-filching from the museum after all! :)
    Gorgeous, gorgeous job!!! I can't wait to see your dress!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much Esther!! I am quite happy with it and more than relieved that there will be no midnight runs to the MET!! Huzzah for that!!
      Blessings!
      g

      Delete
  6. P.S. I think it's hilarious you called the bonnet "curtain" a "curtain!" I always jokingly call it that, not knowing what the real name is either!
    Now to practice writing "Bavolet" 100 times....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha! I know...I looked everywhere and all I saw was the word "curtain" grrrrrrrrr... This getting old and forgetting where I saw, put or whatever, things is starting to get on my nerves! hahahaha!
      Blessings!
      g

      Delete
  7. Beautiful! Your bonnet is so lovely! I've never attempted to make any bonnets other than a very unstructured, corded bonnet for my regency dresses. My only other bonnet is purchased.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Amy! They really are not that hard to make... Just a wee but time consuming. I've always wanted to make a corded bonnet!!!
      Blessings!
      g

      Delete
  8. Such a nice bonnet! I can't get my hats to be super smooth so I usually end up trimming a straw blank (also because I often end up using all my time on the dress!) I can't wait to see your finished ensemble!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Vivien! Believe me, my bonnets are never 100% smooth!! And a lot of the extant bonnets and hats I have seen are never smooth so that makes me happy!! Hope that helps a wee bit in future millinery endeavors!
      Blessings!
      g

      Delete
  9. This is gorgeous, and I honestly feel like yours is pretty than the original ~ scandalous I know! ;)



    xox,
    bonita of Lavender & Twill

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha!! Wow most scandalous!! Thank you so much Bonita!!
      Blessings!
      g

      Delete